Improve Your Oral Health with These Simple Tips

The bad habits we have as kids are often carried into adulthood. This is especially true when it comes to our oral health. A recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 41 percent of children have decay in their baby teeth; a statistic that has not improved since 1970. Furthermore, nearly half of them have untreated cavities that can cause more serious dental issues.

What’s the problem?

Even though most of these cavities affect baby teeth, the infections they may cause can damage growing, permanent teeth. This can cause a whole host of serious, potentially painful dental disorders later in life. There is also amble evidence that suggests that poor oral health is strongly linked to increased risk of heart attack and stroke. In other words, the damage we do to our teeth and gums as children may eventually catch up to us.

What can we do now?

There’s a reason your dentist told you not to eat too much sugar as a kid. Sugar feeds dental plaque, which is the leading cause of tooth decay and gum disease. Brushing, flossing, gargling (mouthwash) can help keep plaque buildup under control. According to dental professionals, every child and adult should brush their teeth twice a day and floss at least once.